Category Archives: New York City

PORT AUTHORITY GETS GOVERNMENT IMMUNITY, WTFU$K

My DailyComplaint has its adrenaline flowing today!!!
We just wanted to reverse the clock on you to 1993.  This was the first attack on the World Trade Center in New York City.  A truck bomb was the plan to bring the World Trade Center down back than.
The state’s top court in Albany, New York yesterday found the Port Authority is entitled to government immunity from negligence claims for failing to deter the 1993 bombing that killed 6 and injured 1000.  WHAT THE FU*K !!
The Port Authority owns the World Trade Center site by the way.
Judge Theodore Jones Jr. wrote, “Any failure to secure the garage against terrorist attack predominantly derives from a failed allocation of police resources.”
Take that — NYPD FINEST !!!
So, does this open some eyes to the conspiracy of 9-11 ?  The Port Authority receives government immunity!!!  WOW, our prayers are with those families that fought these issues in court for so many years. It feels wonderful to have the government step on you too after the loss.
Source = RIP World Trade Center, NY

RENTS Never COME DOWN

rent and shit

Insulated like a cement world, part coffin, part museum environment, one could get that Platonic short sighted vision of the world in a Manhattan apartment.

NYC rents have gone up consistently without stop. The economy has been stuck in neutral forty years without average incomes of citizen Joe’s and Jane’s rising along with rents. It has become a hopeless homeless reality.

Landlords like Trump have no interest unless the government steps in to protect the tenants from usurious rentals. In New York City maybe seventy percent of the city residents would have to move if there were no rent laws in effect. Landlords continually cheat on the laws take protected affordable apartments and convert them into fast turn over spaces or hold spaces empty due to tax codes that favor this practice.

A forty five year squeeze on the middle class, the gift that keeps giving the small one percent’s infinite power, and the trusting average American citizen that cannot fathom how to get out of the nightmare American cartoon dream that is our current reality. The children have no where to go and no hope of owning or renting affordable spaces, ending up living with parents who also struggle to get by.

Even gas has finally got the message and the game of glut and squeeze is ending. But not rents. Especially apartment rentals. Apartments in big cities are less available to the glee of the landlord corporation, inc., the soulless entity with only one directive, the bottom line, the soulless bottom.

Unless you are a degreed millennial working in a major corporation, you cannot afford to live in NYC. Living off of inheritances, social safety networks, rent stabilization, and the like are what constitutes the majority of people still living on Manhattan Island.

Until rents begin to reflect the real incomes of the average citizens, until they tumble to a realistic amount like the price of a barrel of oil today, before a catastrophic event forces rents down it behooves the City to get housing availability and affordability as priority number one. The direction now is a high rise full of deserted apartments with people who have seized the wealth and invested in a view of heaven.

MDC says, Ya’all FUCKED !!!

Battery Park City Authority PEP’s, YOUR FIRED !

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The Battery Park City Authority is taking PEPs off their beat.

MDC issues a congratulations to Adam , who initiated the ineptness and harassment the community was undergoing on a daily basis. The BPCA is another story that needs the same ending.

The Authority’s board voted Tuesday to hire a private security firm to replace what would appear to be most of the city’s Parks Enforcement Patrol’s green-uniformed officers, contracted through the city’s Parks Department, to patrol the neighborhood’s 38 acres of parks. Forty-five PEPs of various ranks are currently assigned to Battery Park City, according to a Parks Department spokeswoman.

The Parks Department and the authority are in “discussions” over the number of PEPs who will remain, the spokeswoman said.

The newly hired company, Allied Barton Security Services, is a nationwide firm with 120 offices and more than 60,000 employees, according to its website. Allied Barton’s security officers, in bright yellow and blue uniforms, will begin patrolling the parks on bike and foot in mid-November, said Caress Kennedy, a vice president of the firm.

The board voted to spend $2.1 million annually on the new services, which is $400,000 less than the authority now pays the city’s Parks Department for its officers, according to a person with knowledge of the PEP contract. But Benjamin Jones, an authority vice president, said the agency will get more for its money and the total paid for both private security and the remaining PEPs will be no more than the authority was paying for the full staff of PEP officers.

“We’re looking at a contract now under the $2.1 million that would still give us services that could be up to 30 percent more in terms of boots on the ground and visibility to the public,” Jones said, noting that the coverage will “go beyond just the green spaces in Battery Park City.”

Bryant Park is the only other city park that is largely staffed by private security. Unlike Battery Park City’s parks, it closes at night.

An authority spokeswoman did not respond when asked in an email why the agency is making the change. In the past, residents have complained about an absence of PEP officers on patrol as well as officers who congregate and seem inattentive. But Anthony Notaro, chair of Community Board 1’s Battery Park City Committee, said his view of their performance lately is a good one, though he has “more questions than answers” about the wisdom of the move.

“The relationship has been up and down but I would say on balance it’s been positive,” said Notaro, who was not aware of the decision until contacted by the Trib.

MDC adds, Mr. Notaro is full of shit and a complete unaware jerk . He makes blanket generalizations when he is completely out of touch. Anthony, you are one tired old hag.

Source:  See more at: http://www.tribecatrib.com/content/private-security-firm-hired-replace-most-battery-park-city-pep-officers#sthash.JY6WzlBz.dpuf

FOX*D UP

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The other morning as I left my apartment I ran into our Super and his son. I stopped to chat and the Super complained about how bad the Mayor of New York City was. His son silently smiled agreeably and I responded.

“I can see that you are “Fox’d Up”. You watch Fox News don’t you.

I hit on something that I keep running into.

The Super was worried about crime noting there were not enough cops, “it is very bad out there”.

“Are you worried?“ I asked. “Watch this”, I said as I put my index finger up my nose, “Look around everywhere, why there are at least twenty cameras watching me pick my nose right now and you are concerned that there are no cops”. “Are you really afraid?”, I questioned, “or are you watching Fox?”.

Immigrants legally here employed by so many, doing well, having income, property, children, grandchildren and yet they have no clue to the America that lives in trust. What happened to that America, many Americans are “Fox’d UP”.

Crime is down in NYC and has been dropping since the time of the Dinkins administration. There are police and police type organizations monitoring our every move especially here in NYC. Even the end to “Stop and Frisk”, hasn’t changed the direction of lower crime rates.

I said further, “the last two Mayors, Rudy Giuliani and Bucks Bloomberg, sold the city out to real estate interests, very few apartments are available to rent and you are lucky they haven’t thrown you out of yours yet. No one can afford to live here any more and you couldn’t afford to move here even if you wanted to”.

MDC says, its over in New York City !!

The 1st NYC Mural Festival

english3First of all – murals, obviously.

But, aside from murals, this festival is going to be a totally family friendly, as guests of all ages are welcome and there will be something for everyone.

On Thursday, August 6th, established artists will be a part of a panel that will be held at also famous Jonathan LeVine Gallery at 7 PM. Then, on Friday, the sculpture garden will open at 114 Mulberry Street, featuring the infamous bust of Edward Snowden, a work by Andrew Tider and Jeff Greenspan. In the evening, there’s another panel in 7 PM, this time on illegal vs. legal street art installations, at Con Artist Collective.

On Saturday, kids will be able to learn how to create their own signature sticker, while learning about sticker culture.

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Also, from 5 PM to 7 PM on Saturday, a live illustration battle will be held between street artists Crash and BIO, where they need to cover 25 feet high walls with black and white images in hour and a half. The winner will be decided by the amount of applause by the audience.

After that, a never seen European cut of “Banksy does New York” will be shown outdoors, and on Sunday there will be a musical concert, with projection of completed murals from the festival.

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GOOGLE ZIPPER IN NYC

 

MDC highlighted the new Google Zipper Taxi Cab back in April of 2012.  It appears NYC, has its hands full with the presence of Uber & Lyft at the moment.

MDC says and bets accordingly , the Google Zipper will not appear in NYC  .

The mayor’s office said that there would be 5000 driverless cabs on New York City streets by 2014.

NYC’s new fleet of 9,000 taxis will be dubbed the “Zipper” and each car in the Google squadron will be called a “Zippie”.

The good news? All Zippies will be electric-bio-fuel hybrids filled with sweet amenities that leave regular NYC Taxi cabs in the dust. Google will not only equip each Zippie with an ATM machine, but vending machines built into the front-seat-back-seat divider will dispense everything from mouthwash to mascara to condoms and even hot food like a NY slice. According to Google, the vending machine offers will change from day to night and season to season to accommodate different needs and tastes. And if you’ve ever been one to step into a regular NYC taxi cab only to be met with a funky smell, or disturbing unmentionables left on the seat, you’ll finally be able to sit in hygienic peace. The new Zippies will be self-sanitizing, turning up a 12 horsepower vacuum to suck up all that unsightliness as soon as passengers exits the car.

So how does it work? The Zipper model is similar to that of the yellow cab, and you can either hail a Zippie — which will be recognized by Google’s above-head-mounted super sensors as a signal to stop — use the Zippie Android app on your smartphone, or hit one of the over 50,000 giant red “+1″ buttons that will be placed around the city. Once you are in the vehicle you can either speak your destination into the Zippie’s “G-phone”, or G-chat your destination to the Zippie via your smart phone, from there the car will take you where you need to go. Foreign tourists don’t need to worry about mastering English; the G-phone currently recognizes over 80 different languages.

At the start of the program, only a limited number of Zippies will go to Brooklyn and Queens.

MDC highlighted the future of autonomous cars in a past article, informing you about what to look out for in the future.

 

 

LA or NYC

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I was born on 148th Street in 1965, and from then until the late 1990s it never dawned on me to live anywhere other than New York City. When I lived on 14th Street in the late ‘80s, I paid $140 a month to share an apartment with a bunch of other odd and dysfunctional musicians and artists. AIDS, crack and a high murder rate kept most people away from New York back then. But even though it was a war zone, or perhaps to some extent because it was a war zone, Manhattan was still the cultural capital of the world. Of course everything’s changed since. New York has, to state the obvious, become the city of money. People say your rent should be 30 percent of your salary; in Manhattan today, at least for many people, it’s hovering around 300 percent.

The gradual shift in New York’s economic fortunes and mores reminds me of the boiling frog theory. If you take a frog and throw it in a pot of boiling water, the frog will do everything in its power to escape. But if you place a frog in room-temperature water and slowly raise the heat, it will boil to death without realizing it’s dying. (I truly hope this theory will never actually be tested.) That’s what happened to me in New York. I was so accustomed to the city’s absurd cult of money that it took me years to notice I didn’t have any artist friends left in Manhattan, and the artists and musicians I knew were slowly moving farther and farther east, with many parts of Brooklyn even becoming too pricey for aspiring or working artists.

New York had entered the pantheon of big cities that people visit and observe and patronize and document, but don’t actually add to, like Paris.

During the 1990s, thanks to the cessation of the crack epidemic, New York became increasingly safer and more affluent, and less artist-friendly, but it was still the place I wanted to call home. What happened next reminded me of Gremlins: you’re not supposed to feed the gremlins after midnight or they metastasize. Gremlin midnight came to New York sometime in the mid-‘90s. I realized then that most people I met in New York were happily observing and talking about culture, but not necessarily contributing to it. It seemed New York had entered the pantheon of big cities that people visit and observe and patronize and document, but don’t actually add to, like Paris. No one goes to Paris imagining how they can contribute to the city. People go to Paris thinking, “Wow, I want to get my picture taken with Paris in the background.” That’s what New York became, a victim of its own photogenic beauty and success.

And, to again state the obvious, New York is exclusively about success—it’s success that has been fed steroids and B vitamins. There’s a sense that New Yorkers never fail, but if they do, they’re exorcised from memory, kind of like Trotsky in early pictures of the Soviet Communist Politburo. In New York you can be easily overwhelmed by how much success everyone else seems to be having, whereas in L.A., everybody publicly fails at some point—even the most successful people. A writer’s screenplay may be turned into a major movie, but there’s a good chance her next five screenplays won’t even get picked up. An actor may star in acclaimed films for two years, then go a decade without work. A musician who has sold well might put out a complete failure of a record—then bounce back with the next one. Experimentation and a grudging familiarity with occasional failure are part of L.A.’s ethos.

Experimentation and a grudging familiarity with occasional failure are part of L.A.’s ethos.

Maybe I’m romanticizing failure, but when it’s shared, it can be emancipating and even create solidarity. Young artists in L.A. can really experiment, and if their efforts fall short, it’s not that bad because their rent is relatively cheap and almost everyone else they know is trying new things and failing, too. There’s also the exciting, and not unprecedented, prospect of succeeding at a global level. You can make something out of nothing here. Take Katy Perry. She’s a perfectly fine singer who one minute was literally couch surfing and the next was a household name selling out 50,000-capacity stadiums. Or Quentin Tarantino, one minute a video clerk, the next minute one of the most successful writer/directors in history. Los Angeles captures that strange, exciting and at times delusional American notion of magical self-invention.

I don’t want to create a New York-L.A. dichotomy, because both cities are progressive and wonderful, and there are clearly many other great American cities. Artists aren’t just leaving New York for L.A.—they’re also going to Portland, Minneapolis, Miami, Atlanta, Philadelphia and countless other places. And, as an aside, I don’t know why they aren’t moving to Newark. It’s 15 minutes away from Manhattan and remarkably cheap. I think it’s the unwarranted New Jersey stigma that unfortunately keeps people from crossing the Hudson. People would rather move to the worst part of Brooklyn and still have the magical “NY” in their address. That single consonant on their mail—”Y” as opposed to “J”— seems to keep people from making that 15-minute trek to Newark.

Plenty of other cities in the United States and abroad are, of course, interesting and beautiful, but I moved to L.A. due to its singular pre-apocalyptic strangeness. It seems equally baffled and baffling, with urban and suburban and wilderness existing in fantastic chaos just inches away from one another. There’s no center to L.A, and in many ways it’s kind of a fantastically confused petri dish of an anti-city. If you’re in New York, Brussels, London or Milan, you’re surrounded by a world that has been subdued and overseen by humans for centuries, sometimes for millennia. They’re stable cities; and when you’re in an older city you feel a sense of safety, as if you’re in a city that’s been, and being, well looked after. You feel like most well-established and conventional cities know what they’re doing. L.A., on the other hand, is constantly changing and always seemingly an inch away from some sort of benign collapse.

Nature, with all its empty, otherworldly expanses, is the constant, hulking neighbor to Los Angeles.

If you look at some of L.A.’s patron saint artists, like Robert Irwin and James Turrell, their work is about the vast, unknowable and at times uncaring strangeness of the world we live in—not the human world, but the natural world. And it makes sense: nature, with all its empty, otherworldly expanses, is the constant, hulking neighbor to Los Angeles. The moment you leave L.A., you’re in a desert that would most likely kill you if you left your water bottle at home. For southern California, humanity is the weird exception, not the rule.

L.A.’s strange environment and contradictions have also shaped the sound of my recent music. My last album, Innocents, is a fairly quiet and domestic record, almost like whistling in the dark in the face of the vast maw. And if I were more of a weird, brave artist—and maybe I’ll do this in the future—I would move out into the desert and let its vastness and uncaringness inform what I’m doing. So far I have made quiet sounds as something of a retreat into my home.

I should admit I have an ulterior motive in promoting L.A. I’m so outspoken about my love for the city because I want my friends to move here. When friends from New York ask me why I moved here, I say, somewhat elusively, “David Lynch lives here, there’s the Museum of Jurassic Technology, rents are relatively cheap, and I can run around outside 365 days of the year. Oh, and there are still recording studios in L.A.” And I’m always sending them real estate listings, especially when they complain about the cost of real estate in New York (in other words: constantly). If the weather is bad in New York in February, I’ll also be a clichéd Angeleno and send them a picture of me outside by the pool. Not just because I’m an asshole and I like shameless Schadenfreude, but also because I think they’d be happier here, especially those who are trying to start families. Even friends of mine who are making very good salaries of $150,000 a year feel dirt-poor when they picture raising kids in New York. My friends who are trying to start families in New York have given up on simple things, like ever having a 50-square-foot backyard for their kids. A good domestic life is simply more attainable here, as L.A has both invented and perfected that strange balance between the suburban and the apocalyptic. But let’s be clear, I have an agenda: I want my friends to join me here so I can sit with them by my pool in February and look at the weather updates for the rest of the Western world and feel smug together.

Source: thx MOBY, the village misses ya!

Congratulations to USA Women’s Soccer



MDC says, Lower Manhattan will be swirling with confetti as thousands attend a parade celebrating the win by U.S. women’s soccer team at the Women’s World Cup.

MDC is perplexed over the celebration since none of the 23 players are from New York. 

Team members will be on a float that will travel along the Canyon of Heroes, a stretch of Broadway where the nation’s largest city has honored its legends. The U.S. squad defeated Japan 5-2 on Sunday in Canada to win its first World Cup since 1999.

The southern end of Broadway is the traditional spot for New York City ticker-tape parades. Most of the route is lined with tall office buildings on both sides, allowing workers to toss bits of paper onto the celebrants below.

City officials have not expressed how large they expect the crowd to be, though tens if not hundreds of thousands of people likely will line Broadway for the 11 a.m. parade. It will feature floats and marching bands, and will be hosted by broadcaster Robin Roberts and former soccer star Heather Mitts. At its conclusion, the team will be honored by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio in front of a crowd of 3,500 people at City Hall Plaza.